Advertisement

Emotional Reactions to the Miscarriage of a Consciously Desired Pregnancy

  • Rochelle Friedman
  • Karen A. Cohen
Part of the Women in Context: Development and Stresses book series (WICO)

Abstract

Miscarriage* is a commonly occurring event. Any pregnancy that terminates spontaneously before the fetus reaches viability may be correctly termed a miscarriage. The majority of reported miscarriages occur in the second or third month of gestation. Early miscarriages, those occurring in the first month or so of pregnancy, often go unrecognized or are noted only as a delayed and perhaps heavier-than-usual menstrual period. Taking this into account, the actual incidence of miscarriage is probably considerably higher than statistics indicate. A conservative estimate is that between 14% and 18% of all pregnancies end in miscarriage.

Keywords

Emotional Reaction Spontaneous Abortion Personality Structure Psychosomatic Research Medical Care System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Corney RT, Horton FT, Jr: Pathological grief following spontaneous abortion, American Journal of Psychiatry 131 (7): 825–827, July 1974.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Grimm ER: Psychological investigation of habitual abortion, Psychosomatic Medicine 24: 369, 1962.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Deutsch H: The psychology of women. Volume 2. Motherhood. New York, Grune & Stratton, 1945.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Tupper C, et al: The problem of spontaneous abortion, American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 73: 2, 313, 1957.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Michel-Wolfromm H: The psychological factor in spontaneous abortion, Journal of Psychosomatic Research 12: 67–71, 1968.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Malmquist A, Kaij L, Nilsson A: Psychiatric aspects of spontaneous abortion, I, Journal of Psychosomatic Research 13: 45–51, 1969.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kaij L, Malmquist A, Nilsson A: Psychiatric aspects of spontaneous abortion, II, Journal of Psychosomatic Research 13: 45–51, 1969.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Simon NM, Rothman P, Goff JT, et al: Psychological factors related to spontaneous and therapeutic abortion, American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 104: 799–806, 1969.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Benedek T: The psychobiology of pregnancy. Boston, Little, Brown, 1970.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Bibring GL, Dwyer TF, Huntington DS, Valenstein AF: A study of the psychological processes in pregnancy and of the earliest mother-child relationship: I. Some propositions and comments. Psychoanalytic study of the child, Vol. 16. New York, International University Press, 1961.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Bibring GL, Dwyer TF, Huntington DS, Valenstein AF: A study of the psychological processes in pregnancy and of the earliest mother-child relationship: II. Methodological considerations. Psychoanalytic study of the child, Vol. 16. New York, International University Press, 1961.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Lindemann E: Symptomatology and management of acute grief. American Journal of Psychiatry, 101, 1944.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Bibring GL: Some considerations of the psychological processes in pregnancy, Vol. 14. New York, International University Press, 1959.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Cain AC, Erikson ME, Fast I, Vaughan RA: Children’s disturbed reactions to their mother’s miscarriage, Psychosomatic Medicine 14(1): 58–66, January-February, 1964.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Friedmann RR, Cohen K: The peer support group: A model for dealing with the emotional aspects of miscarriage, GROUP 4:42–48, 1980.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rochelle Friedman
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Karen A. Cohen
    • 4
  1. 1.Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Massachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA
  3. 3.Harvard University School of MedicineBostonUSA
  4. 4.Capital Area Community Health PlanAlbanyUSA

Personalised recommendations