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Prevention of Iron Deficiency

  • Miguel Layrisse

Abstract

It is well known that lack of iron is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world, especially in developing countries. Its highest prevalence is observed in women during their reproductive life, and also in infants, children, and even in adolescents. The deficiency is produced when there is an imbalance between the iron absorbed from food and that eliminated in the shedding of epithelium, the formation of new tissue, the loss in menstrual blood, and the fetus’s need for iron during gestation. Additional iron loss is caused in developing countries by hookworm, trichuris, and Schistosoma haematobium infections. Consequently, the frequency and severity of iron deficiency are more evident in populations where those infections prevail.

Keywords

Iron Deficiency Iron Absorption Ferrous Sulfate Iron Salt Nonheme Iron 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miguel Layrisse
    • 1
  1. 1.Universidad Central de Venezuela and Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones CientíficasCaracasVenezuela

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