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Post-Harvest Food Losses in Developing Countries

A Survey
  • E. R. Pariser

Abstract

Efforts have been made since the beginning of agriculture to increase crop yields and to reduce food losses at all stages of the food production and distribution chain. It is only within the past 50 years or so that the world community has been called upon to give systematic attention to the identification, assessment, and reduction of food losses in general, but especially those occurring (for whatever reason) between harvest and consumption.

Keywords

Agriculture Organization Food Waste Food Loss Loss Estimation World Food 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. R. Pariser
    • 1
  1. 1.Sea Grant ProgramMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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