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Biodegradable Insecticides Their Application in Forestry

  • Carl E. Crisp

Abstract

The demand for greater output from forest lands has been matched by two other competing demands: maintaining the quality of the environment and more extensive and intensive management of the land. To manage insect pests that compete with human use of forest lands, the resource manager must rely on pesticides (NAS, 1975b). Following the best application strategies is a key part of an integrated pest management program. At the same time, undiminished effort must be made to prevent pollution of the air, land, and water beyond a level considered safe for nontarget life forms. To minimize risks, the resource manager must apply the best scientific findings available.

Keywords

Bark Beetle Gypsy Moth Forest Pest Aerial Application Systemic Insecticide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl E. Crisp
    • 1
  1. 1.Forest Service, U.S. Department of AgriculturePacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment StationBerkeleyUSA

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