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Epigenetic Factors in Neuronal Differentiation

A Review of Recent Research
  • Antonia Vernadakis
Part of the Topics in Developmental Psychobiology book series (TDP)

Abstract

In recent years evidence has been accumulating on the concept that neuronal differentiation and growth are under the influence of both genetic and epigenetic factors. A great portion of the information available has derived from studies using the autonomic nervous system and from in vitro neural model systems. In this chapter I will review some of the observations which have contributed to the view of a pluropotential neuron. Two basic observations have prompted the reevaluation of basic developmental phenomena. One example is that portions of neural crest that normally provide sympathetic neurons may, under certain experimental conditions, provide parasympathetic neurons instead. The other observation is that neurons from a predominantly adrenergic sympathetic ganglion grown under certain tissue culture conditions form cholinergic synapses among themselves and on several types of target tissue in coculture. Finally, studies both in vivo and in vitro have shown that neuronal growth and differentiation are regulated by various epigenetic intrinsic factors such as hormones and neurohumors or substances secreted by the glial cells, the “glial factors.”

Keywords

Glial Cell Thyroid Hormone Neural Crest Neuronal Differentiation Neuronal Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antonia Vernadakis
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Psychiatry and PharmacologyUniversity of Colorado School of MedicineDenverUSA

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