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Parent—Infant Interaction, Attachment, and Socioemotional Development in Infancy

  • Michael E. Lamb
Part of the Topics in Developmental Psychobiology book series (TDP)

Abstract

Perhaps the most dramatic and significant event occurring during the first year of life is the formation of social attachments. Infantile attachments constitute the first social relationships, crown a rapid phase of emergent social understanding, and appear to have long-term implications for the individual’s personality development. In this chapter, I review recent evidence concerning the development of parent—infant attachments in the first year of life. Then I present a perspective on the manner in which the formation of attachments and individual differences can be interpreted. Finally, I discuss evidence concerning the long-term implications of individual differences in the quality of infant—parent attachments.

Keywords

Child Development Parental Behavior Interpersonal Trust Attachment Figure Infant Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael E. Lamb
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Psychology, Psychiatry, and PediatricsUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA

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