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Muscle Training

  • Susan J. Middaugh

Abstract

The use of behavioral methods in muscle training dates from the early years of behavioral psychology, both for neuromuscular reeducation in physical rehabilitation (Franz, 1923) and for deep muscle relaxation in psychotherapy (Jacobson, 1938). Despite this long history, widespread use of behavioral approaches in therapeutic exercise is a relatively recent development, and much of the relevant work has been published within the past decade. The purpose of this chapter is to present an overview of this body of work with an emphasis on reported clinical applications of behavioral principles and procedures in neuromuscular reeducation.

Keywords

Cerebral Palsy Muscle Training Biofeedback Training Progressive Muscle Relaxation Therapeutic Exercise 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan J. Middaugh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA

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