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Relaxation Training and Relaxation-Related Procedures

  • John Palmer Anderson

Abstract

Men and women have earnestly sought a state called relaxation from the earliest of recorded times. Whether it be defined subjectively or, in the more recent scientific tradition, objectively, relaxation is universally considered a desirable and pleasant state. In this chapter, relaxation, relaxation training and related procedures, and the experimental evidence concerning the efficacy of relaxation training in applications to behavioral medicine will be discussed. Although relaxation per se is not always defined within systems of relaxation training, it is usually expected that relaxation is accompanied by a general muscular loosening and a slowing of the flow of thought. The techniques used to elicit such phenomena vary from the truly physical (progressive muscular relaxation) to the purely mental (hypnosis and imaginal relaxation).

Keywords

Behavioral Medicine Psychological Control Relaxation Response Parasympathetic Nervous System Relaxation Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Palmer Anderson
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Special StudiesUniversity of AlabamaBirminghamUSA

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