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Psychological Sequelae to Rape

Assessment and Treatment Strategies
  • Dean G. Kilpatrick
  • Lois J. Veronen
  • Patricia A. Resick

Abstract

The scientific study of the effects of rape is in its infancy, as is the development and evaluation of intervention strategies for rape-related problems. This state of affairs poses certain problems for the writer charged with the task of reviewing virtually nonexistent treatment research and venturing evaluative judgments on the relative merits of behavioral versus more traditional approaches. Therefore, this chapter will of necessity be speculative in nature.

Keywords

Sexual Assault Conditioned Stimulus Sexual Dysfunction Classical Conditioning Coping Skill 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dean G. Kilpatrick
    • 1
  • Lois J. Veronen
    • 1
  • Patricia A. Resick
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesMedical University of South Carolina, and People Against RapeCharlestonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MissouriSt. LouisUSA

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