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Urological Disorders

  • Daniel M. Doleys
  • Ronald L. Meredith

Abstract

Of all the urological disorders, functional nocturnal enuresis is the one most frequently seen by psychologists. Functional nocturnal enuresis can be defined as persistent wetting of the bed in the absence of urological or neurological pathology (Doleys, 1977, 1978). Specific agreement on the age at which a child can be considered enuretic has not been achieved; however, most estimates vary from 3 to 5 years of age. Muellner (1960a,b) suggested that urinary control should be established by the age of 3. In most cases, treatment is not applied to children under the age of 5 (see Doleys, 1977). It has been estimated that nearly 20% of 5-year-olds wet their beds frequently enough to be considered enuretic (Lovibond & Coote, 1970; Oppel, Harper, & Rider, 1968). These statistics change with age, showing that approximately 5% of 10-year-olds and 2% of 12- to 14-year-olds are enuretic.

Keywords

Urinary Retention Bladder Capacity Deaf Child Nocturnal Enuresis Neurogenic Bladder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel M. Doleys
  • Ronald L. Meredith
    • 1
  1. 1.Vaughan ClinicBrookwood Medical CenterBirminghamUSA

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