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Abstract

The arachnids, which comprise one of the three large arthropod groups, have not received much attention from neurobiologists. While there is currently considerable disagreement regarding certain specifics of arthropod phylogeny (Manton, 1977; Gupta, 1979; Herreid, this volume), there is a general concensus that the arachnids possess an evolutionary heritage separate from both insects and crustaceans. The Eurypterids, ancient extinct arachnids, were large and formidable marine predators, so much so that the bony plates of the early Ostracoderms were probably for protection from the Eurypterids (Savoy, 1971). The scorpions, which are thought to have evolved from the Eurypterids, were the first terrestrial invertebrates, emerging from shallow Silurian seas some 400 million years ago (Savoy, 1971).

Keywords

Stance Phase Swing Phase Wolf Spider Step Duration Subesophageal Ganglion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert F. Bowerman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Zoology and PhysiologyUniversity of WyomingLaramieUSA

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