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Oxygen Uptake and Acid-Base Balance during Activity in Decapod Crustaceans

  • B. R. McMahon

Abstract

Whereas a considerable body of work has focused on the physiology of exercise in lower vertebrates, (for reviews see Brett, [1972] and Bennett [1978]), relatively little is known of the capabilities of invertebrate species. With the exception of a few molluscan studies (Thompson et al. 1979), most recent studies have concentrated on the Arthropoda. The majority of studies concern the Insecta, these and a lesser number of studies on Arachnida are reviewed elsewhere in this volume while the present work reviews studies on crustaceans. To facilitate comparison with the full range of studies on other ectothermic animals, studies on both air and water breathing crustaceans are included. Due to particular problems associated with adaptation to freshwater, some work on freshwater residents is also presented.

Keywords

Oxygen Uptake Decapod Crustacean Ventilation Volume Shore Crab Land Crab 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. R. McMahon
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of ClagaryCalgaryCanada

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