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Light Scattering from Cells

  • Sow-Hsin Chen
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSB, volume 73)

Abstract

There is an aspect of application of quasielastic light scattering which deals with measurements of directed motions of particles. The particles can be motile bacteria, swimming spermatozoa or streaming water droplets. The simplest objective in these experiments is to measure the directed speed or speed distribution of the particles. For simplicity let us ignore initially the size effects in the light scattering spectra. This simplication is allowed for instance when the particle dimension is much smaller compared to the wave length of light used, or when the particle has a spheric symmetry so that its light scattering property is independent of its orientation. Using the photon correlation technique we are in effect measuring the Doppler shift in time domain.

Keywords

Scattered Field Time Correlation Function Helical Motion Macroscopic Particle Bull Spermatozoon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sow-Hsin Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Nuclear Engineering DepartmentMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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