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Cell Growth pp 171-218 | Cite as

Condensed Chromatin: Species-Specificity, Tissue-Specificity, and Cell Cycle-Specificity, as Monitored by Scanning Cytometry

Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 38)

Abstract

The main point of this essay will be the question, how condensed chromatin can be interpreted in terms of its molecular determinants and its functional significance, in different taxa. I shall not discuss the lower levels of DNA packaging up to the quaternary structure (or solenoid) in details, as this was recently done by several authors (1–5). It will be shown that condensed chromatin at the quinternary level is species-specific in plants and probably insects, while it is tissue-specific in vertebrates. In all cases, the degree of condensation considerably varies during the cell cycle. The evolution of condensed chromatin including heterochromatin will be discussed. Its possible role in the control of gene activity, determination, differentiation, and morphogenesis is suggested and illustrated by hiterto unpublished quantitative data.

Keywords

Condensed Chromatin Chromatin Organization Constitutive Heterochromatin Electron Microscope Level Decondensed Chromatin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Nagl
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of KaiserslauternKaiserslauternFederal Republic of Germany

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