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In Vitro Culture of the Zygote and Embryo

  • Benjamin G. Brackett

Abstract

Scientific investigations during the last three decades have led to the present capability of nurturing the embryonic development from zygote to blastocyst stages in vitro for several mammalian species including cow (Wright et al., 1976b), ferrett (Whittingham, 1975), man (Edwards et al., 1970), mouse (Whitten and Biggers, 1968; Mukherjee and Cohen, 1970), rabbit (Maurer et al., 1969; Kane and Foote, 1971; Ogawa et al., 1971; Kane, 1972), and sheep (Tervit et al., 1972). As ova of several species (man, rabbit, sheep, cow, and ferret) are relatively large and thus have greater endogenous reserves, it was suggested by Biggers (1979) that they might be more independent of the oviductal and uterine environments before implantation than the relatively smaller ova of other species (rat, hamster, and vole). Successful culture to blastocysts of ferret, mouse, rabbit, and human zygotes has followed in vitro fertilization. Various aspects of preimplantational development of mammalian embryos in culture have been well reviewed previously (see Biggers et al., 1971; Whittingham, 1971, 1975; Brinster, 1972, 1973; Seidel, 1977; Anderson, 1978; Maurer, 1978; Biggers, 1979; Brackett, 1979b; Brinster and Troike, 1979).

Keywords

Mouse Embryo Embryo Culture Blastocyst Stage Vitro Culture Mouse Ovum 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin G. Brackett
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Studies-New Bolton CenterUniversity of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary MedicineKennett SquareUSA
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA

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