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Myelomeningocele (Spina Bifida)

  • James E. Lindemann
  • Robert D. Boyd

Abstract

Myelomeningocele (or spina bifida), as a medical anomaly, has a long past. Brocklehurst (1976) cites its description by Nicholas Tulp in his Observations Medicae of 1652. Effective medical treatment for myelomeningocele has a short history. It begins with the development in the 1950s of new shunting techniques for the hydrocephalus which often accompanies the disorder. Attention to the psychosocial problems of the growing number of persons with myelomeningocele is even more recent. These are problems which become apparent only when a high level of broadly accessible medical care is available, to give an appreciable survival rate beyond infancy.

Keywords

Spina Bifida Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Child Neurology Competitive Employment Psychological Corporation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • James E. Lindemann
  • Robert D. Boyd

There are no affiliations available

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