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Abstract

Traumatic spinal cord injury has been appropriately described as one of the most devastating calamities in human life (Guttman, 1976). It attacks body integrity and threatens life. It rapidly and radically alters the person’s mobility, capacity for self-care, self-image, and social role, and requires unparalleled social and psychological adjustment (Burnham & Werner, 1978–1979).

Keywords

Spinal Cord Spinal Cord Injury Sexual Functioning Vocational Rehabilitation Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • James E. Lindemann
    • 1
  1. 1.The Oregon Health Sciences UniversityPortlandUSA

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