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Abstract

When William J. Little (1862) attributed certain deformities to “abnormal parturition, difficult labors, premature birth and asphyxia neonatorum,” he produced a brilliant contribution to clinical medicine and a colossal headache for taxonomists. The disorders once known as Little’s disease and now known as cerebral palsy have been described by Nelson and Ellenberg (1978) as “not a single disease, but rather a group of conditions differing in topographic distribution, specific manifestations, and associated handicaps, and probably (but to a degree as yet unknown) varying in etiology.” Cohen and Kohn (1979) call cerebral palsy a syndrome, not a definitive diagnosis, and Minear (1956) points out that its treatment is a treatment of symptoms, not of etiology.

Keywords

Cerebral Palsy Spastic Cerebral Palsy Spastic Diplegia Augmented Feedback Spastic Quadriplegia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • James E. Lindemann
    • 1
  1. 1.The Oregon Health Sciences UniversityPortlandUSA

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