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Abstract

Hemophilia is a disease so surrounded by mystique and misunderstanding that it may be difficult to achieve an accurate perception of its physical manifestations. It was described in the Talmud thousands of years ago. Its association with royalty gave it prominence, and its relative infrequency promoted the development of second-hand superstition-tinged “knowledge,” without benefit of empirical observation. A proper understanding of its transmission awaited the discovery of genetic principles, and adequate control depended upon the development of modern blood technology. A full knowledge of its psychophysiology lies in the future. Misinformation persists in the thinking of the general public, as well as that of many health professionals and even of hemophilia sufferers themselves.

Keywords

Vocational Rehabilitation Home Treatment Emotional Adjustment Severe Hemophilia Hemophilic Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • James E. Lindemann
    • 1
  1. 1.The Oregon Health Sciences UniversityPortlandUSA

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