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Coronary Heart Disease

  • James E. Lindemann

Abstract

If the heart has a special symbolism in human affairs, as we suggested in Chapter 11, then coronary heart disease may be seen as a signal pointing insistently to patterns that are destructive in human affairs. The significance of behavior and life style in many risk factors associated with this leading cause of death in the United States is a compelling reason for attention from a wide range of health practitioners.

Keywords

Coronary Heart Disease Vocational Rehabilitation Framingham Study Coronary Heart Disease Patient Coronary Care Unit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • James E. Lindemann
    • 1
  1. 1.The Oregon Health Sciences UniversityPortlandUSA

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