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Transportation and the Behavioral Sciences

  • David T. Hartgen
Part of the Human Behavior and Environment book series (HUBE, volume 5)

Abstract

The policy-oriented disciplines that serve the functions of government and society (e.g., transportation, housing, health, education, energy, environment) are rapidly changing. Each has evolved at an accelerating pace over the last 20 years, after a period of relative lull in the early 1960s. Until recently, these subjects have been treated as distinct and separate entities, but recent trends indicate a growing tendency by analysts to regard them as interrelated and overlapping.

Keywords

Transportation System Behavioral Science Transportation Research Mode Choice Travel Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • David T. Hartgen
    • 1
  1. 1.Transportation Data and AnalysisNew York State Department of TransportationAlbanyUSA

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