Advertisement

An Art Therapy Approach to the Drug Abuser, Correlating Behavioral, Narcissistic, And Laterality Theory

  • Evelyn Virshup
  • Bernard Virshup

Abstract

Drug addicts form a complex, heterogeneous group; it is probably not possible to speak of the treatment of “the drug addict.” In leading a group of drug addicts using art as therapy, it appeared that there was a subset whose traits of spontaneity, of timelessness, and of nonlinear, nonlogical, appositional thinking, showed a remarkable similarity to the functions of the right brain that have been elucidated in numerous clinical and experimental studies.

Keywords

Drug Dependence Drug Abuser Therapeutic Goal Drug Addict Opiate Dependence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adams, J. W. Psychoanalysis of drug dependence. New York: Grune & Stratton, 1978.Google Scholar
  2. Betensky, M. Self-discovery through self-expression. Springfield, Illinois: Thomas, 1973.Google Scholar
  3. Gazzaniga, M., and LeDoux, J. The Integrated mind. New York: Plenum, 1978.Google Scholar
  4. Greenspan, S. Substance abuse: An understanding from psychoanalytic, developmental, and learning perspectives. In J. D. Blaine and D. A. Julius (Eds.), Psychodynamics of drug dependence (National Institute of Drug Abuse Research Monograph No. 12). Washington, D.C.: Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 1977.Google Scholar
  5. Khantzian, E., and Treece, C. Psychodynamics of Drug Dependence: An Overview. In J. D. Blaine and D. A. Julius (Eds.), Psychodynamics of drug dependence (National Institute of Drug Abuse Research Monograph No. 12). Washington, D.C.: Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 1977.Google Scholar
  6. Kohut, H. Preface. In J. D. Blaine and D. A. Julius (Eds.), Psychodynamics of drug dependence (National Institute of Drug Abuse Research Monograph No. 12). Washington, D.C.: Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 1977.Google Scholar
  7. Krystal, H., and Raskin, H. Drug dependence. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1970.Google Scholar
  8. Kurland, A. A. Psychiatric aspects of opiate dependence. West Palm Beach, Florida: CRC Press, 1978.Google Scholar
  9. Kwiatkowska, H. Family therapy and evaluation through art. Springfield, Illinois: Thomas, 1978.Google Scholar
  10. Pickens, R. W., and Heston, L. L. Psychiatric factors in drug abuse. New York: Grune and Stratton, 1979.Google Scholar
  11. Rhyne, J. The Gestalt art experience. Stockton, California: Brooks/Cole, 1974.Google Scholar
  12. Rubin, J. Child art therapy. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1978.Google Scholar
  13. Ulman, E. Art education for the emotionally disturbed. American Journal of Art Therapy, 1977, 17, 13–16.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Virshup, E. Right brain people in a left brain world. Los Angeles, California: Guild of Tutors Press, 1978.Google Scholar
  15. Wadeson, H. Art psychotherapy. New York: Wiley, 1980.Google Scholar
  16. Wurmser, L. Mr. Pecksniff’s Horse? (Psychodynamics in Compulsive Drug Use.) In J. D. Blaine and D. A. Julius (Eds.), Psychodynamics of drug dependence (National Institute of Drug Abuse Research Monograph No. 12). Washington, D.C.: Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 1977.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Evelyn Virshup
    • 1
  • Bernard Virshup
    • 2
  1. 1.Private PracticeWoodland HillsUSA
  2. 2.Univ. of So. Calif. School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA

Personalised recommendations