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Interpersonal Conflict and Mental Imagery

  • Thomas Mallouk

Abstract

If consciousness, as Csikszentmihalyi (1978) suggests, must be understood in a holistic context, then there should be evidence in the products of consciousness of the integration of the person in his or her world that the notion of holism suggest. If contents of consciousness are to be considered an essential and critical area of study in psychology, they must have explanatory value for understanding the behavior of people at the level of human action and experience. Up until now, the study of consciousness pc se has done little to address the criticisms by behaviorism that consciousness is an epiphenomena that contributes little if anything to the control, prediction or understanding of behavior. The recent work of Mischel (1973) and Meichenbaum (1977) among others has begun to consider the role of consciousness in the form of expect-encies, values, inner speech, etc. in the behavior of people. Consciousness, then, has finally been accorded a place in the thinking of behaviorally-oriented psychologists; however, the question of meaning, which has been proposed from the psychoanalytic tradition, is left for the most part unaddressed, even by these more holistically-oriented behaviorists.

Keywords

Mental Imagery Interpersonal Conflict Critical Image Foundation Experience Naturalistic Observation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference notes

  1. 1.
    Mallouk, T. A survey of the self reports of couples in terms of Interpersonal conflict. Unpublished manuscript, 1979.Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Mallouk
    • 1
  1. 1.Community Mental Health CenterChesterUSA

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