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Mental Imagery and Creativity

  • Larry E. Greeson

Abstract

Previous investigations have indicated that mental imagery facilitates learning and memory performance in both children and adults (Bower, 1970, 1972; Bugelski, 1970; Flavell, 1970; Higbee, 1979; Paivio, 1969, 1970, 1971; Pressley, 1977). Moreover, imagery processes have been found to be related to other forms of complex human behavior including creativity, intelligence, and general level of cognitive functioning (Anderson, 1978; Forisha, 1975; McKim, 1972; Piaget & Inhelder, 1971; Paivio, 1971, 1978; Shepard, 1978 a,b).

Keywords

Associative Learning Mental Imagery Experimental Child Psychology Item Pair Mental Deficiency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larry E. Greeson
    • 1
  1. 1.Miami UniversityMiddletownUSA

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