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Contact Stress and Coefficient of Friction Effects on Ceramic Interfaces

  • D. W. Richerson
  • W. D. Carruthers
  • L. J. Lindberg
Part of the Materials Science Research book series (MSR, volume 14)

Abstract

High-temperature, structural application of ceramics often involves ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic interfaces. Chipping and cracking often occur in such applications as heat engines at interfaces where aerodynamic loads and differential thermal movement produce simultaneous normal and tangential forces. A hypothesis of the chipping mechanism will be presented, as will experimental results from a test apparatus designed to evaluate interface compatibility. Results include the influence of contact geometry, temperature, load, dwell time at temperature, lubricants, and interface layers on the static and dynamic coefficient of friction and on material strength.

Keywords

Line Contact Contact Stress Surface Damage Contact Load Biaxial Loading 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. W. Richerson
    • 1
  • W. D. Carruthers
    • 1
  • L. J. Lindberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Garrett Turbine Engine CompanyPhoenixUSA

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