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Experimental Results of Computerized Ultrasound Echo Tomography

  • G. Maderlechner
  • E. Hundt
  • E. Kronmüller
  • E. Trautenberg
Part of the Acoustical Imaging book series (ACIM, volume 10)

Abstract

In a series of experiments on test objects and excised organs we investigated the influence of several physical effects on image quality in the procedure of computerized ultrasound echo tomography. The main results are the following: 1. High resolution of less than one wavelength is demonstrated with simple test objects. This resolution is independent of direction and constant over the whole image plane. 2. Image distortions by interference of waves, well known from B-scans, are strongly reduced. 3. The sensitivity and dynamic range are high and are shown at objects with high contrast. 4. Images of excised organs have essentially better quality than conventional B-scans.

The procedure of computerized tomography is modified for ultrasonic features. Several scanning modes to form the projections are presented. Filtering by convolution is applied in one or two dimensions. Lateral information is included resulting in a superposition of B-scan like images. The image quality is essentially improved.

Keywords

Image Quality Tomographic Image Scanning Mode Acoustical Image Ultrasonic Feature 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Maderlechner
    • 1
  • E. Hundt
    • 1
  • E. Kronmüller
    • 1
  • E. Trautenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.ForschungslaboratorienSiemens AGMüchen 83Germany

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