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Toxin Disorders

  • James W. Jefferson
  • John R. Marshall
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Neuropsychiatric manifestations may be seen following exposure to mercury. The signs and symptoms vary with the form and type of compound involved. Although elemental mercury is not absorbed, poisoning may occur from mercury vapors, organic compounds, and soluble and insoluble inorganic compounds. Acute mercury poisoning, usually the result of ingestion of soluble salts such as mercury chloride, either by accident or with suicidal intent, is an acute medical crisis. Symptoms occur quickly and are caused by severe local inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and renal toxicity. Anuria and uremia are the usual causes of death.

Keywords

Lead Poisoning Myoclonic Jerk Mercury Poisoning Lead Intoxication Organic Brain Syndrome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • James W. Jefferson
    • 1
  • John R. Marshall
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Wisconsin Medical SchoolMadisonUSA

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