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Stabilized Power Plant Scrubber Sludge and Fly Ash in the Marine Environment

  • Iver W. Duedall
  • Frank J. Roethel
  • James D. Seligman
  • Harold B. O’Connors
  • Jeffrey H. Parker
  • Peter M. J. Woodhead
  • Ramesh Dayal
  • Bart Chezar
  • Beverly K. Roberts
  • Hugh Mullen
Part of the Marine Science book series (MR, volume 12)

Abstract

Solid (stabilized), brick-like forms of scrubber sludge and fly ash from coal combustion were tested for their physical properties, leaching behavior in seawater, effect on organisms, and long term stability in a marine environment. Laboratory results showed that trace elements did not leach significantly from test samples. In the field, colonization and overgrowth of test blocks progressed very rapidly, and block integrity, as determined by compressive strength, was maintained for over 500 days.

These preliminary results and other results from ongoing studies suggest that marine disposal of scrubber sludge and fly ash, in the stabilized form, may be environmentally acceptable.

Keywords

Compressive Strength Concrete Block Coal Waste Thalassiosira Pseudonana Concrete Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Iver W. Duedall
    • 1
  • Frank J. Roethel
    • 1
  • James D. Seligman
    • 1
  • Harold B. O’Connors
    • 1
  • Jeffrey H. Parker
    • 1
  • Peter M. J. Woodhead
    • 1
  • Ramesh Dayal
    • 1
  • Bart Chezar
    • 2
  • Beverly K. Roberts
    • 3
  • Hugh Mullen
    • 3
  1. 1.Marine Sciences Research CenterState University of New YorkStony BrookUSA
  2. 2.Power Authority of the State of New YorkNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.IU Conversion Systems, Inc.HorshamUSA

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