Advertisement

Transition and Heavy Metals Associated with Acid-Iron Waste Disposal at Deep Water Dumpsite 106

  • Dana R. Kester
  • Richard C. Hittinger
  • Prithviraj Mukherji
Part of the Marine Science book series (MR, volume 12)

Abstract

Liquid acid-iron waste has been discharged into the surface waters at Deep Water Dumpsite 106 in 4 × 106 liter quantities since 1976. Upon mixing with seawater hydrous ferric oxide precipitates and can scavenge potentially toxic metals (Cu, Cd, and Pb) and organic substances from the waste plume and the seawater. A series of water samples were collected at various times from 0.5 to 27 hours after a dump of acid-iron waste using a non-contaminating pumping system and acoustic backscattering to locate the waste plume in the mixed layer (upper 20 m). The samples were analyzed for total and particulate Fe, Cu, Cd, and Pb, as well as for pH, total suspended matter, phosphate, silicate, temperature and salinity. Because of the high Fe concentrations in the waste (0.5 molar), the total Fe concentration in the waste plume provides a good index of the dilution of the waste. During the first 27 hours after the dump the dilution occurred as a two stage process. There was rapid initial dilution by 104 in the first 0.5 hr followed by slower dilution to 105 after 27 hr. Correlation analysis of the metal concentrations in the waste plume showed that Fe and Pb disperse in a closely coupled fashion related to particulate matter. The Cd and Cu disperse at a slower rate than Fe and Pb and they are less associated with the particulate phase.

Keywords

Waste Disposal Total Suspended Matter Acoustic Backscattering Rank Order Listing Rosette Sample 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bisagni, J, J. and D. R. Rester (1981) Physical variability at an east coast United States offshore dumpsite. In: Ocean Dumping of Industrial Wastes, B. H. Ketchum, D. R. Kester, and P. K. Park, editors, Plenum Press, New York. This volume, pp. 89–107.Google Scholar
  2. Boyle, E. A. and J. M. Edmond (1977) Determination of copper, nickel, and cadmium in sea water by APDC chelate coprecipitation and flameless atomic absorption spectrometry. Analytica Chimica Acta, 91, 189–197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Gross, M. Grant (1976) Waste disposal. MESA New York Bight Atlas Monograph, 26, New York Sea Grant Institute, Albany, N.Y., 32 pp.Google Scholar
  4. Pesch, G., B. Reynolds, and P. Rogerson (1977) Trace metals in scallops from within and around two ocean disposal sites. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 8, 224–228.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Settle, D. M. and C. C. Patterson (1980) Lead in albacore: Guide to lead pollution in Americans. Science, 207, 1167–1176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Spencer, D. W., P. G. Brewer, A. Fleer, S. Honjo, S. Krishnaswami, and Y. Nozaki (1978) Chemical fluxes from a sediment trap experiment in the deep Sargasso Sea. Journal of Marine Research, 36(3): 493–523.Google Scholar
  7. Vaccaro, R. F., G. D. Grice, G. T. Rowe, and P. H. Wiebe (1972) Acid-iron waste disposal and the summer distribution of standing crops in the New York Bight. Water Research, 6, 231–256.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dana R. Kester
    • 1
  • Richard C. Hittinger
    • 1
  • Prithviraj Mukherji
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of OceanographyUniversity of Rhode IslandKingstonUSA

Personalised recommendations