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A Discussion on the Mode of Action of Non-Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: Inhibition of Prostaglandin Synthesis

  • S. H. Ferreira
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series

Abstract

At present there are two lines of thought regarding the mode of action of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs: a) the multiple effect theory which explains their mechanism through interference with various molecular or cellular events (102,103) and b) the PG theory which considers the inhibition of the synthesis of prostaglandins as the common denominator of the mechanism of action of aspirin-like drugs (116).

Keywords

Lysosomal Enzyme Adjuvant Arthritis Sodium Salicylate Inflammatory Exudate Flufenamic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. H. Ferreira
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyFaculty of Medicine of Ribeirão PretoRibeirão PretoBrazil

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