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Generalized Cellular Automata

  • A. Rosenfeld

Abstract

Cellular automata are arrays of processing elements which operate in a synchronous, parallel fashion and can be used to process or classify their arrays of input data. This chapter summarizes work done over the past few years at the University of Maryland on generalizations of the basic cellular automaton concept. It shows how the speed and power of cellular automata can be increased by extending the array into an appropriately connected larger structure or by allowing the individual processors to have larger amounts of internal memory. It also extends the cellular automaton concept to networks of processors in which each node has bounded degree and discusses the graph processing and recognition capabilities of such networks.

Keywords

Cellular Automaton Input String Recognition Capability Quad Tree Distinguishable Neighbor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Dyer, C. R., “Augmented Cellular Automata for Image Analysis,” Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park (1979).Google Scholar
  2. Dyer, C. R., and Rosenfeld, A., “Parallel Image Processing by Memory Augmented Cellular Automata,” IEEETPAMI (1980) (in press).Google Scholar
  3. Rosenfeld, A., Picture Languages, New York, Academic Press (1979).Google Scholar
  4. Wu, A. Y., “Cellular Graph Automata,” Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park (1978).Google Scholar
  5. Wu, A., and Rosenfeld, A., “Cellular Graph Automata (I and II),” Info. Control 42:305–353 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Wu, A., and Rosenfeld, A., “Sequential and Cellular Graph Automata,” Info. Sciences 20:57–68 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Rosenfeld
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Vision Laboratory, Computer Science CenterUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA

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