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Man-Machine Interactive Processing for Extracting Meteorological Information from GMS Images

  • N. Kodaira
  • K. Kato
  • T. Hamada

Abstract

The GMS (Geostationary Meteorological Satellite) views the earth’s disk via the VISSR (Visible and Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer). GMS is positioned at 140°E above the equator at an altitude of about 36000km. The VISSR provides concurrent observations in the infrared (IR) spectrum (10.5–12.5µm) and in the visible (VIS) spectrum (0.5–0.75µm). These observations are transmitted to the ground at periodic intervals; usually every three hours. About 25 minutes are required for the VISSR to produce the digital image of the full earth’s disk.

Keywords

Resultant Vector Matching Surface Vertical Temperature Profile Geostationary Meteorological Satellite Cloud Emissivity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Kodaira
    • 1
  • K. Kato
    • 1
  • T. Hamada
    • 1
  1. 1.Meteorological Satellite CenterKiyose-shi, Tokyo 180-04Japan

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