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Some Neighborhood Operators

  • R. M. Haralick

Abstract

In this paper we review a variety of neighborhood operators in a way which emphasizes their common form. These operators are useful for image segmentation tasks as well as for the construction of primitives involved in structural image analysis. The common form of the operators suggests the possibility of a large scale integration hardware implementation in the VLSI device technology.

Keywords

Neighborhood Operator Output Image Recursive Operator Primitive Function Unique Label 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. M. Haralick
    • 1
  1. 1.Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA

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