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Light Utilization Efficiency in Natural Phytoplankton Communities

  • Zvy Dubinsky
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 19)

Abstract

Before we set out to discuss the concept, definition and measurement of photosynthetic efficiency in the aquatic environment, it would be in order first to try to understand the possible usefulness of such an endeavor. The evaluation of the efficiency of the photosynthetic mechanism in trapping light energy and storing it as potential chemical energy has long attracted plant physiologists and biochemists. The values obtained were considered a touchstone for the validation of models proposed an an explanation of the function of the photochemical machinery. This aspect of photosynthetic efficiencies was reviewed by Rabinowitch (1,2). The results of these studies crystallized around two widely different clusters of values: the first (3,4) estimated the maximum photosynthetic efficiency to be around 100% (about two quanta required per molecule of CO2 reduced), while the second, almost universally accepted (5–7), set its upper limit at about 25% (equivalent to a requirement of 8 quanta per mole CO2 reduced).

Keywords

Quantum Efficiency Photosynthetic Efficiency Phytoplankton Pigment Integral Efficiency Algal Pigment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zvy Dubinsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Life Sciences DepartmentBar-Ilan UniversityRamat-GanIsrael

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