Algal Pigment Systems

  • S. W. Jeffrey
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 19)

Abstract

One-third of the earth’s crust is occupied by land, and this supports a terrestrial vegetation receiving the full visible range of the sun’s radiation. The other two-thirds of the earth’s surface is occupied by the world’s oceans, and these heavily filter the incident radiation. Even at a few meters’ depth, the absorbing and scattering properties of water profoundly alter the light spectrum and reduce the intensity compared to that at the sea’s surface. As a consequence, aquatic plants have evolved a variety of lightharvesting pigment systems for trapping those portions of the visible spectrum available. In contrast, only one light-harvesting pigment system has become dominant in terrestrial plants.

Keywords

Porphyrin Epoxidation Chloro Xanthophyll Carotene 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. W. Jeffrey
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Fisheries and OceanographyCSIROCronullaAustralia

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