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Temperature Adaptation in Phytoplankton: Cellular and Photosynthetic Characteristics

  • William K. W. Li
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 19)

Abstract

Algae, as a group, occupy a wide spectrum of thermal environments ranging from snow and ice to hot springs. In attempting to relate the physiological characteristics of organisms to their ecology, it is necessary to distinguish between what Precht (1) has termed resistance and capacity adaptations. Resistance adaptations to temperature refer to mechanisms that determine the upper and lower temperature extremes limiting growth. Various aspects of this type of adaptation in plants and microorganisms have been reviewed (2–13). Capacity adaptations occur at temperatures between the extremes, or in the so-called “normal” or “biokinetic” range. Such adaptations may be said to exist when responses or characteristics of the organism at a given temperature are dependent on the temperature experienced during growth.

Keywords

Growth Temperature Photosynthetic Rate Relative Growth Rate Particulate Organic Carbon Temperature Adaptation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • William K. W. Li
    • 1
  1. 1.Marine Ecology LaboratoryBedford Institute of OceanographyDartmouthCanada

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