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Developments of A15 Filamentary Composite Superconductors in Japan

  • K. Tachikawa
Part of the Cryogenic Materials Series book series (CRYMS)

Abstract

At the National Research Institute for Metals, the so-called surface diffusion process (SDP) to produce V3Ga tape was invented in 1967.1 In this process, a vanadium substrate is passed continuously through a molten gallium bath in which some copper is added. The copper acts as a catalyst for enhancing the diffusion reaction between the vanadium substrate and the gallium to form V3Ga phase.2 The critical current density versus magnetic field, Jc-H, curve of V3Ga is convex upward in fields above 10 T, and the V3Ga exhibits a higher Jc at fields above 13 T than any other practical superconductors. The V3Ga tape was used to construct the 17.5 T superconducting magnet, which established the highest field record in the world in the superconducting state.3 The invention of the surface diffusion process led to the following success of the so-called composite diffusion process, which enables the fabrication of multifilamentary type-V3Ga superconductors.4 The multifilamentary V3Ga wires were expected to be much more stable than the tapes and to be useful for applications in time varying fields.

Keywords

Heat Treatment Time Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Gallium Concentration Nb3Sn Layer Magnetic Field Curve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Tachikawa
    • 1
  1. 1.National Research Institute for MetalsSakura, Niiharigun Ibaraki 305Japan

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