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Neuronal Activity Associated with Conditioned Limb Movements

  • Eberhard E. Fetz

Abstract

The development of techniques for recording activity of single neurons in the central nervous system of conscious, behaving animals was optimistically hailed two decades ago as a major advance toward the analysis of neuronal mechanisms of behavior. Previously, information concerning the functions of particular regions of the central nervous system had been obtained primarily by observing the behavioral consequences of experimental and clinical lesions, or by analyzing the responses evoked by electrical stimulation. Ablation experiments can provide important clues as to those functions that depend on the integrity of specific areas and that cannot be subserved or compensated by other regions. Likewise, “electroanatomy,” that is, investigation of pathways by electrical stimulation, can elucidate the neural connections between various centers. Neither method, however, can provide any information on the normal activity of cells in the relevant regions. Until recently, activity of single neurons had been recorded only in anesthetized or surgically reduced preparations; although such preparations were useful to document sensory responses to peripheral stimulation, they were of limited value in analyzing normal motor mechanisms.

Keywords

Conditioned Stimulus Motor Cortex Brain Research Unit Activity Limb Movement 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eberhard E. Fetz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and Biophysics and Regional Primate Research CenterUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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