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Eye-Head Coordination

  • Albert F. Fuchs

Abstract

When an object of interest appears in our visual world, we usually turn our eyes in its direction to have a look. In all mammals, each eye is controlled by three pairs of extraocular muscles that provide eye motility with three degrees of freedom within the head. In turn, the head is mounted on a very versatile neck that provides head movements about a naso-occipital axis (roll), an interaural axis (pitch), and a vertical axis (yaw). Finally, the head movements are superimposed upon the movements of a trunk, which also has three degrees of freedom. Therefore, a shift of gaze, especially to a distant eccentric target, can be considered as the sum of three components: (1) the eye movement that would be elicited by the visual stimulus alone; (2) the eye movement elicited by the head movement alone; and (3) the eye movement elicited by rotation of the body alone.

Keywords

Smooth Pursuit Vestibular Nucleus Head Rotation Experimental Brain Research Vestibular Neuron 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert F. Fuchs
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and Biophysics and Regional Primate Research CenterUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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