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The Rise and Fall of ‘Political Development’

  • Fred W. Riggs

Abstract

Is “political development” one word or two? “What a trivial question,” you may think, “who cares, and what difference does it make?” The answer is that if it is one word, we can define it, and this will affect how we use it in the study of political behavior. But if it is two words, a phrase, then we should define each component word, “political” and “development,” and the whole point of this essay dissolves.1

Keywords

Political System Political Participation Political Institution Political Change Political Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fred W. Riggs
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceUniversity of HawaiiHonoluluUSA

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