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Public Opinion and Ideology

  • Alan D. Monroe

Abstract

The term “public opinion” connotes both a phenomenon of mass political behavior and a field of study with both scholarly and applied aspects. This chapter will attempt to summarize major findings about public opinion, including its origins, correlates, content, and consequences. Particular attention will be given to the narrower concept of “ideology” and the applicability of that concept to the mass public.

Keywords

Public Opinion Economic Issue American Political Science Review Political Socialization Mass Public 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan D. Monroe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceIllinois State UniversityNormalUSA

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