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Maintaining Data Base Integrity

  • Jay-Louise Weldon
Part of the Applications of Modern Technology in Business book series (AMTB)

Abstract

Data base integrity refers to both the accuracy and the availability of the data base. If a data base has integrity, then it is a correct and dependable model of the organization’s information processing requirements. To maintain the integrity of a data base, the dba must be able to ensure both the quality of the data base contents and the correctness of the processing applied against that data base.

Keywords

Data Base Concurrency Control Data Base Structure Backup Copy Data Base Access 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jay-Louise Weldon
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Business AdministrationNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA

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