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The Application of the Physicochemical Properties of Boiling Bitterns to the Interpretation of Brine Migration Experiments Related to Salt Repositories

  • Michael A. Clynne
  • Robert W. PotterII
  • Valerie L. Thurmond
Part of the Advances in Nuclear Science & Technology book series (ANST)

Abstract

An important unresolved question with respect to employing mined cavities in bedded rock salt as high level radioactive waste repositories concerns the behavior of small quantities of included bittern brines (Mg, Na, K, Ca//C1, SO4, Br-H2O). These bittern brines have been shown to migrate at significant rates under the influence of a thermal gradient such as would be imposed by emplacement of high level waste (1). However, present estimates of the rate of migration of the bitterns range considerably because there is a lack of physicochemical data at the relevant compositions, concentrations, temperatures and pressures to solve the rate equations. This lack of appropriate physicochemical data for bitterns saturated with halite and the failure of theoretical models to address movement along grain boundaries have emphasized the need for field and large scale laboratory tests to measure the rate and quantities of brine which actually arrive at an individual waste canister (2, 3). In this report we present experimental data applicable to interpretation of the results of field and large-scale laboratory tests aimed at quantifying the brine migration phenomenon.

Keywords

High Level Waste Steam Condensate Physicochemical Data High Level Radioactive Waste Nuclear Waste Management 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    E. Roedder and H. E. Belkin, “Application of Studies of Fluid Inclusions in Permian Salado Salt, New Mexico, To Problems of Siting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant,” Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management 1, (G. J. McCarthy, ed; Plenum Press, NY, 313–322, 1979 ).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    W. B. Krause and P. F. Gnirk, “Dome Salt Brine Migration Experiments at Avery Island, Louisiana,” Proceedings of the National Waste Terminal Storage Program Information Meeting, October 1979. Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation 62, 97–100 (1979).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    A. R. Sattler, H. C. Walker and T. O. Hunter, “In-situ Experiments to Support Development of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP),” Abstracts Symposium G, Annual Meeting of the Materials Research Society (1979).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    R. L. Bradshaw and W. C. McClain, Project Salt Vault, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Report ORNL-4555, 356 (1971).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    R. W. Potter, II, R. S. Babcock and D. L. Brown, “A New Method for Determining the Solubility of Salts in Aqueous Solutions at Elevated Temperature,” Journal of Research of the U.S. Geological Survey, 5, 389–395 (1977).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael A. Clynne
    • 1
  • Robert W. PotterII
    • 1
  • Valerie L. Thurmond
    • 1
  1. 1.United States Geological SurveyMenlo ParkUSA

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