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Krypton-85 Storage in Solid Matrices

  • G. L. Tingey
  • E. D. McClanahan
  • M. A. Bayne
  • W. J. Gray
  • C. A. Hinman
Part of the Advances in Nuclear Science & Technology book series (ANST)

Abstract

Of the several radioactive inert gas isotopes generated by the fission process in nuclear reactor fuels, only Kr-85 has a long enough half-life (10.73 years) to be considered for long term storage. Kr-85 decays to Rb-85 releasing a beta particle with a maximum energy of 0.66 MeV and a very low flux of 0.52 MeV gamma rays. The chemical inertness of this isotope reduces markedly the biological effects of the gas but contributes to its long lifetime as a component of the earth’s atmosphere. In the past, the small quantities of Kr-85 generated and subsequently released from the fuel have been dispersed in the atmosphere, but federal regulations to take effect in 1983 limit the release to 50,000 Ci/gigawatt-yr of electrical power generated by a nuclear reactor (1). This amount is about 15% of that generated in a typical light water reactor (LWR) fuel. To meet this requirement, studies are underway to develop methods of separating the Kr from other reactor gases and storing it for periods of about 100 years until decay is largely complete.

Keywords

Spot Welding Light Water Reactor Nuclear Waste Management Substrate Bias Voltage Pacific Northwest Laboratory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Nuclear Power Operation,“ Federal Register 42 (9), Title 40, Part 190, Jan. 13 (1977).Google Scholar
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    M. A. Bayne, R. W. Moss and E. D. McClanahan, “Krypton Entrapment in Continuous Biased, Sputter-Deposited Glassy Metals,” Thin Solid Films 63, 137 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. L. Tingey
    • 1
  • E. D. McClanahan
    • 1
  • M. A. Bayne
    • 1
  • W. J. Gray
    • 1
  • C. A. Hinman
    • 2
  1. 1.Pacific Northwest LaboratoryRichlandUSA
  2. 2.Hanford Engineering Development LaboratoryRichlandUSA

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