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Multibarrier Storage of Savannah River Plant Waste

  • M. D. Dukes
  • W. C. Mosley
  • W. N. Rankin
  • M. H. Tennant
  • J. R. Wiley
Part of the Advances in Nuclear Science & Technology book series (ANST)

Abstract

The Savannah River Plant (SRP), operated by Du Pont for the U.S. Department of Energy, has produced nuclear materials for national defense programs since 1953. Acidic waste from the fuel reprocessing facilities on the plant site are neutralized and made alkaline for storage in large carbon steel tanks. Most fission products and waste actinides along with large amounts of nonradioactive waste (Fe, Mn, Al, etc.) precipitate from the alkaline solution to form an insoluble sludge on the bottom of the waste tanks. Supernatant liquid is evaporated to form salt cake and residual liquor that are also stored in the waste tanks. About 20 million gallons of waste are now stored at SRP. To provide for long term management of this waste, a conceptual process for incorporating waste in borosilicate glass is being developed at the Savannah River Laboratory. Solidified waste will be shipped to a federal repository.

Keywords

Waste Form Waste Glass Backfill Material Leach Rate Waste Package 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. D. Dukes
    • 1
  • W. C. Mosley
    • 1
  • W. N. Rankin
    • 1
  • M. H. Tennant
    • 1
    • 1
  • J. R. Wiley
    • 1
  1. 1.Savannah River LaboratoryE. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Inc.AikenUSA

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