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Fixation of Medium-Level Wastes in Titanates and Zeolites:Progress Towards a System for Transfer of Nuclear Reactor Activities from Spent Organic to Inorganic Ion Exchangers

  • S. Forberg
  • T. Westermark
  • R. Arnek
  • I. Grenthe
  • L. Fälth
  • S. Andersson
Part of the Advances in Nuclear Science & Technology book series (ANST)

Abstract

In order to limit the activity level in different water compartments of nuclear power stations, streams of water are passed through organic ion exchangers, mostly in mixed beds. After use, the organic resins from Swedish reactors are either incorporated in concrete blocks or dried, mixed with melted bitumen and poured into drums. In both cases, the end volume is larger than the bed volume of the exchanger. Considerable volumes have to be stored or disposed of in a safe way. The time to be considered is a few centuries, mostly due to the fission products 90Sr and 137Cs. There are reasons for concern about the long term stability and leaching resistance of the concrete blocks and bitumen as well. Inorganic ion exchangers could be sintered to products of small volume and high stability.

Keywords

Radioactive Waste Nuclear Power Station Concrete Block Gamma Dose Rate Nuclear Waste Management 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Forberg
    • 1
  • T. Westermark
    • 1
  • R. Arnek
    • 2
  • I. Grenthe
    • 2
  • L. Fälth
    • 3
  • S. Andersson
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Nuclear ChemistryThe Royal Institute of TechnologyStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Department of Inorganic ChemistryThe Royal Institute of TechnologyStockholmSweden
  3. 3.Inorganic Chemistry 2Institute of TechnologyLundSweden

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