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Therapeutic Justice

An Overview and a Discussion of Civil Commitment Standards and Procedures
  • David B. Wexler
Part of the Perspectives in Law & Psychology book series (PILP, volume 4)

Abstract

The criminal justice system and related mechanisms of social and legal control are today experiencing a period of marked doctrinal and philosophical tension. Actually, the tension is not new, and the current conflict simply marks the latest phase—with a somewhat modern twist—of the tug-of-war between the “classical criminology” (a blending of Kantian retributive justice and the utilitarianism of Cesare di Beccaria and Jeremy Bentham) and the “deterministic criminology” of Enrico Ferri.

Keywords

Supra Note ApPLIED Behavior Analysis Juvenile Court Civil Commitment Insanity Defense 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • David B. Wexler
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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