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Secretory Proteins in the Male Reproductive System

  • Peter Petrusz
  • Oscar A. Lea
  • Mark Feldman
  • Frank S. French
Part of the Biochemical Endocrinology book series (BIOEND)

Abstract

The male reproductive system in mammals consists of two anatomically and functionally interconnected parts: the testis, where both spermatozoa and male hormones (androgens) are formed, and the duct system with the attached glands, where final maturation and storage of spermatozoa occur. The seminiferous tubules of the testis, the duct of the epidydimis, and the subsequent segments of the duct system draining the accessory sex glands are highly specialized to provide a suitable environment in which the final maturational changes of spermatozoa can take place and to assure optimal composition of the semen.

Keywords

Sertoli Cell Seminiferous Tubule Seminiferous Epithelium Ventral Prostate Male Reproductive System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Petrusz
    • 1
  • Oscar A. Lea
    • 2
  • Mark Feldman
    • 3
  • Frank S. French
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy and Laboratories for Reproductive BiologyUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Department of PharmacologyUniversity of BergenBergenNorway
  3. 3.Department of Pediatrics and Laboratories for Reproductive BiologyUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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