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Humanistic Psychology

  • Benjamin B. Wolman

Abstract

The humanistic movement in psychology represents an attempt by a diverse group of theorists to extend the scope of psychology and personality theory beyond the areas of behaviorism and psychoanalysis. In its efforts to provide alternatives to these two long-standing areas of psychological thinking, the humanistic movement has come to be known as a “third force” in psychology. This term was introduced by Abraham Maslow, a major proponent of this movement. Theorists such as Erich Fromm, Gordon W. Allport, Henry A. Murray, Kurt Goldstein, Andras Angyal, Abraham Maslow, Gardner Murphy, and Carl Rogers, to name a few, are highly individual in their own work, and their theories have little in common. However, all these psychological thinkers have stressed the uniqueness of the individual and believe that the improvement of the human condition is at least theoretically possible. Indeed, all of them hold a fundamentally optimistic view of human potentialities and maintain that traditional scientific approaches with their limited and fragmented view of the individual have obscured the actual range of human capacities. Many of these theorists agree that man is living a constricted and unsatisfying life, particularly because he is not in touch with areas of his awareness which are vital aspects of his humanity.

Keywords

Humanistic Movement Humanistic Psychology Personality Theory Personality Organization Organic Trait 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin B. Wolman
    • 1
  1. 1.Long Island UniversityBrooklynUSA

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