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Spectrophotometry and Fluorometry

  • Robert Lahue

Abstract

Before going into detail, it may be advisable to provide an overview of the principles that underlie the techniques to be discussed in this chapter. The most important physical principles involve the relationships between the wave and particle properties of both light and matter and the interaction of light with matter. Some understanding of certain concepts of quantum physics is fundamental to an understanding of the theory of the techniques described below, although it clearly is not necessary for the routine use of these techniques.

Keywords

Electromagnetic Radiation Vibrational Energy Diatomic Molecule Rotational Transition Nodal Plane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Lahue
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Renison CollegeUniversity of WaterlooWaterlooCanada

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